Resources

February 25, 2013

I thought I would create a post that lists resources I have come across that may be helpful to my fellow LIS students.

I Need a Library Job (inalj)
This website lists all sorts of library jobs, not just the traditional ones. They even have lists international jobs if working overseas interests you.
http://inalj.com/

Job Analysis Part 2/Job 2

February 22, 2013

This post is a continuation of my previous Job Analysis post. In this entry I will talk about the skills and education I have and the skills and education I need to be hired for the second job I analyzed. The second job I analyzed was the Digital Archive Cataloging Librarian position at the Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences (AMPAS).

Skills, Competencies, and Knowledge Required:
The applicant should posses a Master’s degree in Library Information Science from an ALA accredited program. If hired he/she will review others’ work and correct cataloging errors and perform online original cataloging for photographs and digital images according to in-house guidelines. Duties will also include describing visual content of mages and assign controlled vocabulary terms, maintaining accuracy and consistency and update catalog records when needed. Other responsibilities include researching and verifying name, subject, and headings to conform appropriate authority files and in-house conventions and handle photographic and archival materials with care according to in-house guidelines. The applicant must have one year of relevant cataloging experience, as well as experience cataloging using an online bibliographic utility applying AACR2 standards and LC classification system subject headings as well as experience of cataloging using non-MARC formats. The applicant should also have attention to detail, strong communication skills, and the ability to work independently or as part of a team. Knowledge of film history is also highly desired.

Skills, Competencies, and Knowledge I bring to the Table Today:
Right now, I am more qualified for this job than the one at the NMAACH. I already have one year of archival experience in cataloging, however the AMPAS uses a different system than we use at The Wright Museum. I have only used MARC for cataloging. Having worked in archives for three years, I know how to properly handle delicate and sensitive material. Even though the AMPAS guidelines are different from The Wright Museum, I know how to adhere to guidelines once I learn them. I have use the Library of Congress classification system subject heading when cataloging books, DVDs, magazines, and other archival materials. My time at The Wright Museum has given me a great attention to detail.

Education, Certificates, Experience Needed Obtain this Job:
Obviously the first step I need to take is completing my MLIS and Archival Administration certificate. Taking electives in digital archives would be a smart idea. And as I have already mentioned, I plan to do just that. I also need experience using different databases and AACR2 standards. I should look for entry-level cataloging jobs, internships, or practicums that use AACR2 and something other than the MARC format. Most of my cataloging experience is from cataloging books. I need to obtain more experience cataloging photographs and digital items. This can be done through me asking for assignments like these at The Wright Museum. Even though I love movies, I do not posses a vast knowledge of the film industry or history. I see this as an excuse to watch classis movies and research the film industry.

Consider if I Should revise my Personal Goal/Objectives Posted Earlier:
Again, I do not think I really need to revise my goals listed earlier. This is still and archival position that involves digital archives and preservation. I may need to take some extra cataloging classes I had not planned on though.

I really like the sound of this job and hope I am able to find something similar to it when I graduate.

Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.oscars.org/about/employment/digital-archive-cataloging-librarian.html

Job Analysis Part 2/Job 1

February 22, 2013

This post is a continuation of my previous Job Analysis posts. In this entry I will talk about the skills and education I have and the skills and education I need to be hired for the first position I analyzed. The first job I analyzed was the Archivist position at the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) at the Smithsonian in Washington, D.C.

Skills, Competencies, and Knowledge Required:
Bachelor’s degree in archival science or a bachelor’s degree with a major that included 18 semester hours in archival science or related field or a combination of education and experience- at least 30 semester hours that included courses shown above, plus appropriate experience or supplemental education.

The position requires the applicant to be able to create and implement the NMAAHC organizational plan for archival and photographic collections, video, sound, and various digital media. The position also requires that the applicant develop and implement formal policies and procedures for collections access and consult with museum staff to ensure security and preservation of collections. Organize, enter, and maintain information concerning collections in the Smithsonian database and other appropriate national and international databases. Also, the applicant if hired will provide day-to-day management of the Archives unit. Finally, the job requires the applicant to have one-year full time experience at the Grade 12 level in a position similar to this job posting.

Skills, Competencies, and Knowledge I Bring to the Table Today:
Right now, I do not meet many, if any, of the requirements this job lists. While I have a bachelor’s degree, it is not in the required field. While I do have about three years experience working in an archives not all that time was as a paid employee. Only about a year of the experience is as a paid employee, but only part time and nowhere near the pay grade required. Furthermore, the main thing I do at the Wright Museum archives is process and catalog collections. I have never had to create or implement any plans or policy; the Wright Museum already has the implemented plans and policy, I just follow them. Right now, the main required skill I have is probably the part about entering the information about collections into the Smithsonian database, this is assuming their database is similar to the one used by The Wright Museum which Archivists Toolkit. Even if it is not the same, since I already know one database, I will probably be able to learn another fairly easily. In conclusion, I am definitely not qualified to do this job, right now.

Education, Certificates, Experience Needed:
Like I said, as of right now, I am definitely not qualified for this job. There is a lot of additional education and experience I need before I could even consider applying for a job like this.

Even though it is not listed, I think completing the MLIS program with the Graduate Certificate in Archival Administration would fulfill the education requirements. If anything it would make me more desirable to have arrival education at the graduate level as opposed to the undergraduate level. First and foremost, I need to earn my MLIS and Archival Administration certificate. As far as experience goes, I need more at a higher level with more responsibilities. Perhaps, I could look for a job within the Smithsonian but at a more entry-level position. This would give me contacts as well as experience so when an Archivist position opens up I will already have my foot in the door. Even if I cannot find an entry-level position at the NMAACH or Smithsonian any full-time entry-level position at any archives would be a good start. Basically, I will need to work my way up. This job also requires some preservation and restoration, as I mentioned earlier I already plan on taking two electives that cover just that. This, I feel is a good start; I may however need to take additional courses or maybe look into another certificate focusing specifically on preservation. I could also look for internships dealing specifically with preservation and restoration to get some practical experience. In conclusion, I have a long way to go before I would qualify for a job like this. It may not be anytime soon, but one day I will qualify for a job like this and I will get a job like this.

Should I revise my Personal Goals and Objectives:
I do not think I really need to revise my personal goals listed in an earlier post. I said that I wanted to work in archives and this is an archival position. I did also mention that I am interested in digital conservation and preservation. This NMAACH job is not all about preservation but it does involve it in some capacity. I think I am on track with the goals and objectives listed earlier. Though, who knows, they may still change as I progress though the program and see what all is out there is terms of jobs.

USA Jobs. (February 14, 2013). Smithsonian institute: Job title archivist
Retrieved from. https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/337738900.

Job Analysis Part 1/Job 2

February 22, 2013

This job is through the Academy of Motion Picture Art & Sciences (AMPAS) in their film archives. I have always loved movies and my sister is always telling me I should work in the film industry. That’s is actually what lead me to look for recent listings in film and TV. This lead me to the AMPAS website and quite frankly what I think is an awesome job posting. I only wish I had thought of this before I conducted my student guided seminar on information science careers beyond the library.

Job Title:
Digital Archive Cataloging Librarian

Agency:
Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences (AMPAS)

Salary Range:
Not Listed

Job Summary:
The Digital Archive Cataloging Librarian works under the Digital Archivist and will conduct data clean up of existing records and other image databases and catalog digital images as they are acquired.

To me, this job sounds amazing. Not only am I interested in digital libraries, archives, and preservation, but I also love movies. I also enjoy cataloging and have a bit of experience cataloging at The Wright Museum. This job would allow me to combine things that I love and am very interested in.

Duties:
The applicant if hired will review others’ work and correct cataloging errors in the digital asset management system; perform online original descriptive cataloging for photographs and digital images according to in-house guidelines. Duties will also include describing visual content of mages and assign controlled vocabulary terms, maintaining accuracy and consistency and update catalog records when needed. Other responsibilities include researching and verifying name, subject, and headings to conform appropriate authority files and in-house conventions and handle photographic and archival materials with care according to in-house guidelines.

I would say that the original cataloging is what attracts me to this job the most. I mentioned earlier that I am looking forward to taking LIS 7750 Introduction to Library and Archival Preservation and LIS 7730 Administration of Visual Collections for my Archival Administration certificate. I think LIS 7730 would be a very relevant class for this job.

Education:
Master’s degree in Library Information Science from an ALA accredited program.

A MLIS is both a reasonable requirement and expected. I would have been surprised had it not been listed.

Experience:
The applicant must have one year of relevant cataloging experience, as well as experience cataloging using an online bibliographic utility applying AACR2 standards and LC classification system subject headings as well as experience of cataloging using non-MARC formats. The applicant should understand how to properly handle photographs and other archival materials. The applicant should also have attention to detail, strong communication skills, and the ability to work independently or as part of a team. Knowledge of film history is also highly desired.

I am not familiar with AACR2, in fact I had never heard of it. A quick Google search fixed that. AACR2 stands for Anglo-American Cataloging Rules. It is designed for use in the construction of catalogues in libraries and archives of all sizes (About AACR2 2006). LC, I assume means Library of Congress. The Library of Congress classification system is commonly used in libraries and archives across the nation.
Cataloging experience is another expected requirement. I like that it only asks for one year experience which means this job could be in my more immediate future than the first. Looking at all of the listed requirements, they all seem very reasonable and typical. Attention to detail is essential when cataloging, as is knowledge of multiple cataloging systems. I really like that part of the working environment is working independently. While I can, and do enjoy working with a team I must admit I prefer working alone, especially when cataloging. I like that I would be able to plug into my iPod and do my cataloging thing.

I have to admit that even though I said I always wanted to end up in archives in Washington D.C. I like this job better. I really like cataloging and digital archives. The fact that this job is also related to the film industry in just buttercream icing on the chocolate cake.

Academy of Motion Picture Arts & Sciences. (2013). Retrieved from http://www.oscars.org/about/employment/digital-archive-cataloging-librarian.html

American Library Association, Canadian Library Association, & the Chartered Institute of Library and Information Professionals (2006). Retrieved from http://www.aacr2.org/about.html

Job Analysis Part 1/Job 1

February 22, 2013

For the next couple of entries I will be looking at couple of recent job postings that interest me. The first one is a job in archives and requires a little more experience. It may be something for me to look into a little farther down the road, after I am more established.

Job #1:

This job is through the Smithsonian Institute at the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC) in Washington, D.C. It has been kind of a “dream” of mine to end up in Washington, D.C., though I always envisioned the National Archives and Records Administration. However, I was unable to find any recent job postings for the National Archives. This job looks very interesting and would be something I would like to do, either at the NMAAHC or the National Archives.

Job Title:
Archivist

Agency:
Smithsonian Institution

Salary Range:
$89.033-$115,742/year

Job Summary:
This Archivist position is located in the Division of Curatorial Affairs within the National Museum of African American History and Culture (NMAAHC). Responsibilities include cataloging, overseeing the care and restoration of the Museum’s photography, film, sound, and digital media.

Duties:
The applicant, if hired will create, promote, and implement the NMAAHC organizational plan for archival and photographic collections, video, sound, and various digital media. He/she will develop and implement formal policies and procedures for collections access and consult with museum staff to ensure security and preservation of collections. The applicant must be able to organize, enter, and maintain information concerning collections in the Smithsonian database and other appropriate national and international databases. He/she will provide day-to-day management of the Archives unit.

I would have to say that the care, organization, and restoration of the NMAAHC’s photography, film, sound, and digital media are aspects of the job that interest me most, especially the preservation of collections part. I am looking forward to taking electives such as LIS 7750 Introduction to Library and Archival Preservation and LIS 7730 Administration of Visual Collections for my Archival Administration certificate. I am very interested in learning about restoration and conservation so these classes are on the top of my electives list. Because the NMAAHC is a new museum that has not even opened yet the Archivist hired will pretty much be creating the archives from scratch and implementing its policy. While, challenging this would be a great job for someone to really get in at the ground level and create a wonderful, state of the art archives.
The job listing does not really specify whom the position reports to except for mentioning that he/she will be working with museum staff and managing the day-to-day operations of the Archives Unit. So this is a supervisory position, which is definitely not my favorite aspect of the job. As for whom he/she would report to, that would likely be the department head.

Education
All applicants need to meet the following education requirements. Bachelor’s degree in archival science or a bachelor’s degree with a major that included 18 semester hours in archival science, history and/or political science, and 12 semester hours in one or a combination of archival science, history, American civilization, political science, public administration, or government.
OR
A Combination of education and experience- at least 30 semester hours that included courses shown above, plus appropriate experience or supplemental education.

Even though I do not possess the required bachelor’s degree required, I think that a MLIS with a Graduate Certificate in Archival Administration would be appropriate and applicable. In fact I am a little curious as to why it was not listed under desired education in the first place. To me, at an established place such as the Smithsonian, they would at least mention some kind of post-baccalaureate or Master’s degree as a requirement. I would think that in a job of this level a master’s degree would not only be desired, but required.

Experience:
One-year full time at the Grade 12 level in a position similar to this job posting.

Grade 12 is part of the federal government pay scale; there are 15 grades with 10 steps each. Basically, they want the applicant to be at a certain pay level. Grade 12, step 1 is about $60,274 a year; step 10 is about $78,355 a year. Most jobs listed on USA Jobs have some sort of pay grade requirement. Though not meeting this particular requirement has never stopped me from applying for a job.

I was again surprised that only one year of experience is listed under requirements. However, after thinking about it for a few minutes I remembered it also lists that the pay grade during this year minimum of experience is about $60,274 a year. A pay grade at this level would indicate that the applicant had been in archives a number of years, as one does not generally start out at that high of a pay level. So more accurately, I would guess that the applicant would have at least five years working in an archives. This is a conservative guess; an applicant would probably have even more than five years experience working in archives.

This looks like a pretty typical archival job. I would love to have a job like this and be able to live in Washington, D.C. Hopefully, one day I will be able to make it happen.

Fed Jobs. (2013). Base general schedule pay scale: Rates frozen at 2010 levels.
Retrieved from http://www.fedjobs.com/pay/pay.html.

Kokemuller, N. (2013). Grade levels in government jobs. Retrieved from
http://www.ehow.com/info_8594400_grade-levels-government-jobs.html

USA Jobs. (February 14, 2013). Smithsonian institute: Job title archivist
Retrieved from. https://www.usajobs.gov/GetJob/ViewDetails/337738900.

Professional Associations

February 16, 2013

In this post I will write about two professional associations related to LIS.

Society of American Archivists (SAA)

Basic Information
The SAA was founded in 1936 and is North America’s oldest and largest national archival professional association.

Mission
According the SAA’s An Introduction to SAA webpage (2013). Its mission is “To serve the educational and informational needs of more than 6,000 individual and institutional members and to provide leadership to ensure the identification, preservation, and use of records of historical value.”

Membership Categories
Membership is available to anyone working in or studying archives, records, or private papers and those who wish to support the SAA.
The SAA offers four different categories of membership.
Individual Full Membership- Annual dues are based in salary and range from $48-$240
Student- Annual dues are $48. Students need to provide proof of their student status, a copy of a student ID or letter from an advisor are acceptable.
Individual Associate- Annual dues are $90 for U.S. residents or $110 for non-U.S. residents. An associate member cannot hold any positions and do not get to vote. They can however be a part of roundtables and sections and receive all benefits.
Institutional- Annual dues are $285 for “regular” institutional members and %525 for “sustaining” institutional members. The difference between the two is “sustaining” members receive two copies of the SAA’s publications and a free copy of every book published by the SAA during membership.
To apply to join the SAA visit their website at http://www2.archivists.org/membership

Membership Benefits
Being a member of SAA comes with numerous benefits. First, members get access to the SAA’s two publications. They also receive discounts at the SAA bookstore, on registration fees for the annual meeting and workshops, access to mentoring programs, section and roundtable membership to connect with colleagues, and a directory of SAA members for networking.

Publications
The American Archivist, published semi-annually and available both in print and online.
This publication is about thinking about theoretical and practical developments in the archival profession, the relationships between archivists and the creators and users of archives; and about cultural, social, legal, and technological developments that affect the nature of recorded information and the need to create and maintain it.

Archival Outlook, is published six times a year, distributed as a membership benefit.
This is a newsletter that updates members about important business regarding the SAA. It also relates relevant news to the archival profession.

Priorities
The SAA has three main priorities/beliefs:
Technology: Rapidly changing information technologies challenge the archival profession. It demands that the archives community accesses and preserves records in all formats.
Diversity: The relevance of archives depend somewhat on the profession’s success in ensuring that the materials they collect and manage, and the people they serve reflect the diversity of society.
Public Awareness/Advocacy: Archivists actively promote the importance of archives in order to increase public support and obtain the resources needed to protect the accessibility of archival records and ensure the protection of citizens’ rights, the accountability of organizations and governments, and the accessibility of historical records.
http://www2.archivists.org/about/introduction-to-saa

Activities
The SAA hosts an annual meeting every year. The annual meeting takes place in late summer and changes the host city every year. This year, it will be held in New Orleans. There are a wide variety of events including workshops, education sessions, exhibits, tours of local repositories, and of course, networking opportunities.

The SAA also observes American Archives Month. According to the American Archives Month 2012 webpage the month is “an opportunity to raise awareness about the value of archives and archivists” (2013). As part of American Archives Month, the SAA provides public relations kits designed to make archives more visible. These kits can do anything from help plan events to prepare for a media interview.

Website/Social Media Presence
The SAA has a well designed, user-friendly website. The home page has links to relevant articles and archival news. You can even apply for membership on the website.
The SAA also has a wide social media presence with accounts on Facebook, Twitter, and Linkdin. They also keep a blog called Off the Record: Join the Conversation with SAA leaders. Check out the blog at http://offtherecord.archivists.org/.

I chose SAA because in addition to obtaining a MLIS I am also obtaining a Graduate Certificate in Archival Administration. I currently work in an archives and may want continue to do so after graduation. I plan on joining SAA because it would be a great networking opportunity and I could keep up with current events in the world of archives through the publications.

Special Library Association (SLA)

Basic Information
The SLA was founded in 1909 in New York. It is currently the international organization that represents the interests of thousands of information professionals in over 80 countries.

Mission
According to the Vision, Mission, and Core Value Statements webpage (2009), the mission of the SLA “promotes and strengthens its members through learning, advocacy, and networking initiatives.”

Vision
According to the Vision, Mission, and Core Value Statements webpage (2009) the vision of the SLA “is the global organization for innovative information professionals and their strategic partners.”

Core Values
According to the Vision, Mission, and Core Value Statements webpage (2009) the core values are:
Leadership: To strengthen our roles as information leaders and shape information policy.
Service: To respond to our clients’ needs by adding value to information services and products.
Innovation and Continuous Learning: To embrace innovative solutions to enhance the intellectual advancement of the profession.
Results and Accountability: To deliver results with the highest level of ethics and honesty.
Collaboration and Partnering: To provide opportunities to communicate and collaborate within the information industry.

Membership Categories
The SLA offers three categories of membership.
Full Membership- Annual dues are based on salary and range from $40-
$200. A full member can also pay a flat fee of $540 for a three-year membership. This option comes with a 10% discount.
Organizational Membership- This type of membership is granted to any organization that wants to support the objectives and programs of the SLA. Annual dues are $750.
Student Membership- This type of membership is granted to any student enrolled in a LIS or IS program. Annual dues are $40. Student status must be proven to qualify for this type of membership.

Membership Benefits
There are a number of benefits available to members. First, members have access to professional development opportunities through Click University, an online portal to a myriad of learning opportunities. Members can participate in Webinars and experiment with new technologies through Innovation Lab. Click University also offers certificate programs for members to improve their credentials.
The SLA hosts an annual conference and INFO-EXPO. The conferences provide a place for networking, communication, and learning.
The SLA offers chapter membership that allows members to connect with professionals living in the same area. Division membership links members with other professionals in the same field. Members also have access to the membership directory so they can connect with other professionals. Student groups allow student members support and leadership opportunities. Members also receive a subscription to the SLA publications. These do not encompass all the benefits of membership. For a full list refer to the website http://www.sla.org/content/membership/mbrbenefits/index.cfm.

Publications
Information Outlook online provides members free access to articles in SLA’s magazine.
SLA Connections is an e-newsletter published by the SLA. You have to have a subscription or be a SLA member to access this publication.
Some chapters and divisions of the SLA have their own publications.

Priorities
The SLA is dedicated to promoting the value of information professionals. This encompasses shaping public policy and advocating the profession to potential employers and the public.

Website/Social Media Presence
The SLA website is a good site and user friendly. However, I found that I liked the SAA website better. It was a little more difficult to find the different categories of membership on the SLA website. At first, I thought they did not offer different categories. It took a little digging, but I did find the list of membership categories eventually.
The SLA has both Facebook and Twitter accounts. It also has a number of blogs. The SLA has seven blogs of its own, while different chapters and divisions host their own blogs as well.

I chose SLA because I may be interested in working in a special library or non-traditional library setting. I am not sure if I will join SLA as a student. I may wait until I graduate or have a better idea of my career path.

References:

Society of American Archivists. (2013). American archivists month 2012. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/initiatives/american-archives-month/american-archives-month-2012

Society of American Archivists. (2013). An introduction to the saa. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/about/introduction-to-saa

Society of American Archivists. (2013). Society of american archivists. Retrieved from http://www2.archivists.org/

Special Libraries Association. (2009). Special libraries association: Connecting people and information. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/

Special Libraries Association. (2009). Vision, mission, and core value statements. Retrieved from http://www.sla.org/content/SLA/AssnProfile/slanplan/index.cfm.

Personal Goals/Objectives

January 26, 2013

I am going to be blatantly honest.  My time in the Library Information Science (LIS) program at Wayne State is about finding a job; that is my end game.  Of course, I would not be in this program if I did not want to pursue LIS as a career.

My main goal is to find a job within a few months after I graduate.  Not just any job, but one that I want to do and will look forward to going to every day.  Continuing with blatant honesty, I also want a job that pays well.  I do not need to make a lot of money, but I do not think a job that pays enough to cover all my expenses (rent, insurance, food, etc.) and leaves some left over for savings and a life is too much too ask for.  Basically, I do not want to live paycheck to paycheck.  Oh yeah, benefits would be nice too. Unfortunately, in today’s world that may be a pretty tall order.  I hope my expectations are not too high.  I just need to try to remain optimistic, which is not one of my strengths.

My objectives while in the program include taking the courses that will make me desirable to potential employers and gaining the necessary experience that will make them want to hire me.  My plan is to be as practical as possible in my elective choices while still taking my own interests into account.  However, in the end I am going to go with what I believe will get me hired.  Going in this direction, I do plan on earning a Graduate Certificate in Archival Administration.  But lately, I have been thinking Records Information Management might be better in terms of job opportunities.  I would like to take the introductory course to determine if Records Information Management is something I would like to pursue. Furthermore, I am also interested in Special Collections, specifically rare books, manuscripts, and photographs.  In respect to Special Collections, I am very interested in conservation and have my eye on a couple electives tailored to just that.  As you can see I am all over the place in my goals and objectives while in the LIS program.  This is something I hope to have more figured out by the end of my first semester.  Through taking my first classes and completing my Plan of Work I will hopefully have a more concrete plan for the rest of my time at Wayne State.

Right now, my career plans are pretty much just as ambiguous as my plan for the LIS program.  Ideally, I would like to work in Washington, D.C., particularly the National Archives.  More specifically, I would like to work in digital preservation and conservation.  For now, my game plan is to monitor job postings and listerves to see what is out there.  I will pick out the jobs that interest me and make my elective selections based on what these jobs are looking for in a candidate.  Also, I will use these job postings to find internships that will get me the experience I need.  In the end, I will try not to be too picky in my job search.  I already know I will move almost anywhere for a job.

Something else I hope to achieve throughout my studies are good grades.  It has been a while since I have been a student and as a result I am scared of failing.  That is probably my biggest fear this first semester, not being able to cut it in a graduate school setting.

Despite my fear of failing.  I am going to do the best I can and remain confident that not only will I thrive in the LIS program, but that it will also lead to a great job that I love.